Raising Farm Animals

So I had been reading Temple Grandin’s book recently.  So far a lot of what she writes I know, from my previous reading but more from my experiences.  But one thing I did not know about was how hair whorls in cows are associated with their behavior.

cattle hair whorls

So today I looked at the whorls on our cows.

Marji

Marji, not sure about her whorl

Indy

Indy, medium whorl

Bug

Bug, slightly high whorl

Maddie

Maddie, medium whorl

Sydney

Sydney, slightly high whorl

It seems about right.  Now I need to look back at photos of our now gone cows, especially the wild ones like Hana to see if it correlates.

The way I learn the most is just by taking the time to watch the animal behaviors.  Their movements and body language communicate a lot.

Here are contented sheep.  They are spread out.  Some laying down, and some up eating.  Ears are not perked up, and they are looking different directions.  They are quiet.

contented sheep

And here are contented chicks.  They are scattered and not huddled.  Some are eating, and some are drinking.  They are not focused on me at all.  You can’t hear it, but they are cheeping quietly.

eating and drinking

So I will keep reading this book and see if I can learn more than I already know by observation.

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6 Responses to Raising Farm Animals

  1. Jeanne says:

    Well! That’s just plain fascinating!! I’ve never heard of such a thing before. As soon as you started talking about your cows, I got suspicious of Indy…. Hm! Do dogs have whorls on their faces? I don’t think so, but you can definitely see differences in temperament between dogs.

    Like

    • Jeanne says:

      I looked at the “Britain Trip…” and really enjoyed the pictures, especially of the animals. The spinning and weaving tools were interesting, too! How long were you gone?

      Like

    • Donna says:

      Not sure about dog whorls but cattle whorls seems to be an indication. It is interesting that she chose Highlands as an example of high whorls for her book. They are definitely wild.

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  2. Marlys says:

    Very interesting!

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